FEATURE ON ANGLO-INDIAN FOOD AND ON ME IN TIME OUT DELHI 7TH JUNE 2013 ISSUE

Time Out Delhi

FEATURE ON ANGLO-INDIAN FOOD AND ON ME IN TIME OUT DELHI 7TH JUNE 2013 ISSUE

DEVIL PORK CURRY

1 kg Pork (less fat) cut into medium size pieces

2 tablespoons vinegar

1 tablespoon Worcester sauce or Soya Sauce

2 tablespoons Tomato sauce

3 tablespoons oil

3 large onions sliced

2 tablespoons chopped garlic

2 tablespoons chopped ginger

8 to 10 Curry Leaves

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds powder (Methi)

1 teaspoon mustard powder or paste

2 pieces cinnamon

3 cloves

3 teaspoons chillie powder

1 teaspoon turmeric powder

Salt to taste

3 tablespoons oil

Marinate the pork with the Vinegar, Worcester / Soya Sauce, Tomato Sauce, sugar and salt for about 1 hour. Heat oil in a pressure Cooker or pan and sauté the onions, curry leaves, chopped ginger, chopped garlic, cinnamon and cloves till light brown. Add the marinated pork, chillie powder, turmeric powder, fenugreek powder, mustard and mix well. Simmer for a few minutes till the meat becomes firm. Add sufficient water and pressure cook for about 15 to 20 minutes till the pork is cooked. Open the pressure cooker and simmer till the gravy is thick. Serve with Rice, Bread or Chappatis.

Feature Article in The Hindu (Neighbourhood) 13/5/2010

EGG PLANT / BRINJAL BAKE

½ -kg mutton mince or beef mince
4-big seedless Brinjals
4-tablespoons oil
1 -big onion sliced finely
1-tomato chopped finely
4-tablespoons oil
1-tablespoon flour
1-teaspoon salt
1-teaspoon pepper powder
4-green chilies chopped finely
2-pods of garlic chopped finely
2-eggs beaten well
4-tablespoons breadcrumbs or semolina

Method

Wash the Brinjals and put them whole into boiling water with ½ teaspoon salt and cook for about 5 minutes till they are half cooked. Cut the brinjals into halves lengthwise dividing even the stalks. Scoop out the insides and keep aside. Heat 2-tablespoons oil in a pan and add the onions, mince, tomato, salt, pepper, green chilies, garlic and cook on low heat till the mince is cooked and all the water is absorbed. Add the cooked insides of the brinjals and mix well. Keep aside to cool for some time. When slightly cold, fill this cooked mince in the scooped out brinjal halves and press well. Coat with the beaten egg and sprinkle the breadcrumbs or semolina on the top. Brush the sides with oil and place in a baking tray. Drizzle the remaining oil all over the stuffed brinjals and bake in a hot oven for about 10 minutes till brown on top. Serve hot with bread and chips.
(The stuffed bringals could also be shallow fried like cutlets instead of baking)

CHOW-CHOW AND TOMATO CURRY (Vegetable Marrow and Tomato Curry)

½ kg tender squash / vegetable marrow
2 onions chopped finely
A few curry leaves
1 teaspoon ginger paste
1/2 teaspoon garlic paste
½ teaspoon mustard seeds
2 teaspoons chilly powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
2 medium size tomatoes chopped
2 tablespoons oil
Salt to taste

Remove the skin, wash and cut the squash / vegetable marrow / chow chow into medium size pieces and keep aside. Heat oil in a pan and add the mustard. When they splutter add the curry leaves and onions and fry till golden brown. Add the tomatoes chilly powder, salt, tumeric powder, coriander powder, ginger and garlic paste and sauté for a few minutes. Now add the cut vegetable and mix well. Cook on low heat for a few minutes till the pieces of squash / vegetable marrow are cooked. Care should be taken not to over cook or they will get smashed.

Green Masala Fish Fry

1 kg good fleshy fish cut into thick slices
2 teaspoons garlic paste
1 medium size bunch coriander leaves
1 teaspoon cumin powder
3 green chillies
¼ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
4 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons vinegar

Grind the green chillies and green coriander together to a paste. Mix in the cumin powder, garlic paste, salt, turmeric powder and vinegar. Marinate the fish slices with this paste and keep aside for half an hour. Heat oil in a flat pan and shallow fry the fish on both sides till brown. Serve with Rice and Pepper water or Bread.

Coq au Vin or Rooster in Red Wine,

Coq Au Vin is a Burgundian dish, and is considered a French comfort food. The traditional recipe for Coq au Vin did not include chicken, but rather a “Coq,” which is a rooster.
The red wine in the recipe was used not to mask flavor, but to allow the acids to help break down the old meat of the rooster True coq Au Vin was actually finished with the blood of the rooster stabilized with brandy and vinegar, this would help the blood not clot. Initially blood of the rooster was used to thicken the dish.

This dish was originally introduced in India by the French. It has since undergone changes in the method of cooking and now has a distinct Anglo-Indian flavour to it. It was quite a popular dish in the places where the French ruled such as Pondicherry, Karikal, Yanum, etc
Coq au Vin or Rooster in Red Wine,
1 chicken preferably a rooster about 1 kg in weight cut into 6 large pieces
2 medium carrots, cut into chunks
2 medium sized onions, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
2 medium sized tomatoes, chopped
2 teaspoons crushed garlic
1 teaspoon chopped ginger
1 bay leaf
2 tablespoons chopped coriander leaves
3 cloves
1 piece cinamon
1 teaspoon black pepper powder
5 cups red wine
¼ cup Cognac or brandy
2 tablespoons cooking oil
salt to taste
2 teaspoons sugar
1 tablespoon chillie powder

Marinate the rooster or chicken with all the above ingredients and set aside for about one hour. Heat oil in a suitable pan and add the marinated rooster / chicken pieces. Cover and cook on low heat till the pieces are well cooked and the gravy is thick. Serve with bread or dinner rolls.